Professor Michael D. Sokoloff


Michael D. Sokoloff
Physics Department, ML 11
University of Cincinnati
Cincinnati, OH 45221-0011

tel:    513 556-0533
fax:   513 556-3425

Teaching:

In the spring quarter of 2010 I am teaching General Physics 1 (Physics 201). This is the first quarter of a three-quarter calculus-based physics sequence designed for engineering students. It should also be appropriate for students of mathematics, chemistry, physics, geology, etc., who have had, or are co-enrolled, in calculus. A course overview is available on the web.

In the winter quarter of 2010 I taught General Physics 1 (Physics 201). This is the first quarter of a three-quarter calculus-based physics sequence designed for engineering students. It should also be appropriate for students of mathematics, chemistry, physics, geology, etc., who have had, or are co-enrolled, in calculus. A course overview is available on the web.

In the winter quarter of 2009 I am teaching Physics 711. This is the second quarter of the three-quarter graduate-level Quantum Mechanics course. It is designed for students of physics. It should also be appropriate for students of mathematics, chemistry, and engineering who have completed the first quarter of the sequence (15-PHY-710), or the equivalent. During this quarter we will primarily study the theory of angular momentum and the roles of symmetries. First, however, we will complete our study of the WKB method, and the remaining topics in the second chapter of Sakurai. If time permits, we will begin to study approximation methods. The syllabus is available on the web.

In the fall quarter of 2006 I taught Physics 507. This is the first quarter of a three-quarter senior undergraduate/first-year graduate level Quantum Mechanics course. It is designed for students of physics. It should also be appropriate for students of mathematics, chemistry, and engineering who have good backgrounds in physics and mathematics. At the end of this quarter, students should have the ability to solve the time-independent Schrodinger Equation in one and three dimensions for a number of interesting cases. Along the way, we will learn some of the relevant mathematics and we will discuss the interpretation of the wave function in non-relativistic quantum mechanics. The syllabus is available on the web.

In the spring quarter of 2006 I taught Physics 509. This is the third quarter of a three-quarter senior undergraduate/first-year graduate level Quantum Mechanics course. It is designed for students of physics. It should also be appropriate for students of mathematics and engineering who have good backgrounds in physics. We studied the variational principle, the WKB approximation, time-dependent perturbation theory, scattering theory, and the Dirac equation. The syllabus is available on the web.

In the winter quarter of 2006 I taught Physics 508. This is the second quarter of a three-quarter senior undergraduate/first-year graduate level Quantum Mechanics course. It is a continuation of Physics 507 which was taught in the fall quarter. We studied the theory of angular momentum, identical particles, atoms and molecules, and then we learned how to use perturbation theory to solve a variety of problems. The syllabus is available on the web.

In the fall quarter of 2004 I taught Physics 507. This is the first quarter of a three-quarter senior undergraduate/first-year graduate level Quantum Mechanics course. It is designed for students of physics. It should also be appropriate for students of mathematics and engineering who have good backgrounds in physics. At the end of this quarter, students should have the ability to solve the time-independent Schrodinger Equation in one and three dimensions for a number of interesting cases. Along the way, we will learn some of the relevant mathematics and we will discuss the interpretation of the wave function in non-relativistic quantum mechanics. The syllabus is available on the web.

In the spring quarter of 2004 I taught Physics 509. This is the third quarter of a three-quarter senior undergraduate/first-year graduate level Quantum Mechanics course. It is designed for students of physics. It should also be appropriate for students of mathematics and engineering who have good backgrounds in physics. We will study time-independent perturbation theory, the variational principle, the WKB approximation, the Dirac equation, and time-dependent perturbation theory. The syllabus is available on the web.

In the winter quarter of 2004 I taught Physics 508. This is the second quarter of a three-quarter senior undergraduate/first-year graduate level Quantum Mechanics course. It was designed for students of physics. It should also be appropriate for students of mathematics and engineering who have good backgrounds in physics. We studied the theory of angular momentum, identical particles, atoms and molecules, some issues in statistical physics, and then we will then learn how to use perturbation theory to solve a variety of problems. The syllabus is available on the web.

In the fall quarter of 2003 I taught Physics 507. This is the first quarter of a three-quarter senior undergraduate/first-year graduate level Quantum Mechanics course. It is designed for students of physics. It should also be appropriate for students of mathematics and engineering who have good backgrounds in physics. At the end of this quarter, students should have the ability to solve the time-independent Schrodinger Equation in one and three dimensions for a number of interesting cases. Along the way, we will learn some of the relevant mathematics and we will discuss the interpretation of the wave function in non-relativistic quantum mechanics. The syllabus is available on the web.

In the spring quarter of 2002 I taught Physics 842, the second quarter of the two-quarter graduate-level survey of particle physics. The syllabus is available on the web. In this course we studied gauge theories as the basis of the Standard Model of particle physics.

In the winter quarter of 2002 I taught Physics 841, the first quarter of the two-quarter graduate-level survey of particle physics. The syllabus is available on the web. In this course we covered the phenomenology required to understand CP violation in neutral B-meson decays in the Standard Model of particle physics and related topics.

In the fall quarter of 2001 I taught Physics 104, the first quarter of Introductory Physics a 3-quarter sequence which focuses on concepts rather than the ability to solve problems. The syllabus is available on the web.

In the spring quarter of 2001 I taught Physics 842, the second quarter of the two-quarter graduate-level survey course in particle physics. The syllabus is available on the web. In this course we studied gauge theories as the basis of the Standard Model of particle physics.

In the winter quarter of 2001 I taught Physics 841, the first quarter of the two-quarter graduate-level survey of particle physics. The syllabus is available on the web. In this course we covered phenomenology required to understand CP violation in neutral B-meson decays in the Standard Model of particle physics.

In the winter quarter of Y2K I taught Physics 201, the first quarter of the calculus-based General Physics sequence. The syllabus for that course is available on the web.

In the fall quarter, 1999, I taught Physics 321, the first quarter of the sophomore-level Methods in Physics course. The syllabus is now available, as is a nominal schedule. Homework assignments will be posted and brought up to date during the quarter.

The syllabi for the for junior-level Electricity and Magnetism sequence I taught in the 1998-1999 academic year are available as well. Please see P304, P305, and P306.

I also taught an honors seminar, Topics in Contemporary Science , in the winter quarter of 1999.

Research Interests:

  • heavy quark physics
  • the interplay of the strong and weak nuclear interactions

Current Experiments

  • the BaBar experiment at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC)

  • The 2008 Nobel Prize in Physics was awarded to Kobayashi, Maskawa, and Nambu for their work on symmetry breaking and CP violation. Understanding the origins of CP violation is one of the primary goals of the experimental programs of both the the BaBar and the Belle experiments, which were mentioned by name in the Nobel press release. The BaBar Collaboration has prepared a statement explaining the meaning and importance of this work. The Belle Collaboration has prepared a similar statement.

    See also related articles at:  SLAC Today   Nature   Science   Symmetry Magazine    Videos of the Nobel lectures are also available. See Kobayashi, Maskawa, and Nambu.

E-mail: mike.sokoloff [at] uc.edu

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last significantly modified March 26, 2010